Friday, October 15, 2010

The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald

Title: The Great Gatsby
Author:
F. Scott Fitzgerald

Pages: 180, paperback
Publisher: Scribner
Age Group: Classic
Pub. Date: 1925

Overall Rating:
.5

The mysterious Jay Gatsby embodies the American notion that it is possible to redefine oneself and persuade the world to accept that definition. Gatsby's youthful neighbor, Nick Carraway, fascinated with the display of enormous wealth in which Gatsby revels, finds himself swept up in the lavish lifestyle of Long Island society during the Jazz Age. Considered Fitzgerald's best work, The Great Gatsby is a mystical, timeless story of integrity and cruelty, vision and despair.

- Synopsis from Barnes & Noble

The Great Gatsby - Above perfect average writing intricately deep with every line, The Great Gatsby doesn't disappoint. In fact, you learn alot about yourself that you didn't know before reading it. If it wasn't because I had to read this for school, I would have never in my wildest dreams given this book a chance. I came to discover, why it's a classic and why it's still a popular book today. It's the complex, fascinating writing about chasing a single dream to reach the America Dream and love, that still keeps people picking up the book today.

Nick, a simple guy who reserves himself from judgment, tells the story about Jay Gatsby. Gatsby is a penniless soldier who falls in love with Daisy a rich chick with class and money. Gatsby falls madly in love for Daisy and her class, so he pursues her, her love, and the American Dream. She's too glorious for Gatsby to resist. In the effort to attain her love, Gatsby builds his life with money, fame, recognition, fortune, and luxury to win her heart.

This love story is unlike any other, Gatsby would do anything in his power to get Daisy to love him. As readers, we learn how far is too far? Can loving too much be dangerous? Can money buy love? What happens when you live for so long with a single dream? Plus, the most melancholic beautiful thing - the aftermath and consequence to living with a single dream for so long like Gatsby.

From the beginning the book holds strong depth that takes you to other dimensions to discover the emptiness in people soul's even though they're surrounded by luxury. There's a fast-moving, thought-provoking beautiful flow of symbolism, metaphors, similes, you name it. It's packed with so much truth- like how in the end dreams are like roses and the sun. Roses have thorns and fade away eventually, while the sun burns you (symbolism used in the book).

To sum up, it's an important timeless classic that is brilliantly woven. That will teach you about love, dreams, lies, justice, social differences, hate, money and what it can (and cannot) buy..., while enjoying the twists and turns and surprising ending (too bad I was spoiled). Give this one a chance!


Content Rating:

Rated PG - General Audience


Content Comments:

This book is appropriate for a general audience. The Great Gatsby has minimal to no references to sex, drugs, profanity, cussing, etc.

Rating:
Plot: (9/10)
Characters: (9/10)
Ending: (8/10)
Enjoyment: (9/10)
Cover: (5/10) *Not Counting*
Overall: 45/50 = 90% = A-

Cover:
Illustrates main themes in the book that are very important, you just have to know what they are to appreciate the cover.

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Info or to Buy The Great Gatsby:

4 comments:

Christina said...

I loved this book when we read it in high school! So good. Great review!

Cass (Words on Paper) said...

I'm not so sure I did the fact that you throw the cover in there as part of the rating, since the cover does not attribute to the actual reading of the book.

Anyway, nice review. I had to study it for school, too. It's one of the better ones. :)

Dahlia (TheBookShopaholic) said...

I was thinking the same thing, I gave it a 5 on Good Reads. Thanks for telling me =)

Blueicegal ♥ said...

Sounds like a great read, enjoyed your review :)